Selling Antiques Began at Barnes and Nobles

Bookstore and Antiques, Peas in a Pod

High antique neck sake bottle

One of our favorite pit stops is Barnes & Nobles and the Starbucks coffee bar at Barnes and Noble (Springfield, Mo). On one such memorable outing, I was sitting with my husband, pouring over a pile of antique books with a vanilla latte in hand (and an oatmeal cookie) when a man asked if I liked antiques.

We were soon regaling each other with our antique collections. Not much later, we decided to buy his antiques to re-sell along with ours.

He had inherited antiques from his mother’s antique store, as well as Asian imports he had collected personally. At first thought, he planned to open a shop himself; on second thought, he decided against it. It was at that fateful time we bumped into each other at B&N.

His collection of antiques included family pieces from New York, Asian pieces he had bought as an importer, and his mother’s shop inventory. He kept his favorite pieces, but everything else was for sale.

He delivered the inventory the following week, and gave us wholesale prices on each item. When we tallied the items, the sale total was $3,000. He was delighted when we wrote the check but we were rather dismayed, wondering what we had done.

Selling a truck load of antiques

Since we had shelled out $3,000, we were anxious to make money. So we jumped into action, taking photographs, researching items, and firing up eBay.

Fortunately for us, this young man was generous of heart and wished us well. The next time we bumped into each other at B&N, he gave us two mini loads of vintage farm tools and other eclectic items, free of charge.

From those two trunk loads of free tools, we sold pitchforks and bicycle seats and horse shoes and goat bells – all over the world – which turned out to be fun and profitable.

Selling antiques brings new friends

We have learned much about the world around us and artisans from the past as we  researched the incredible items our new friend sold us that day. And we always look forward to seeing him again on our trips to Barnes & Noble because the conversations are always good.

I tell you all this because an ingredient to the intrigue of selling antiques is the people you meet. It’s paramount to have a good inventory. Then, when you pair up a great item with a customer, sales takes on a rewarding dimension.
Antique wooden gear mold

Published by

Patricia Wiskur

My love for art comes from years in the studio of Wiskur Productions, with my husband, Darrell Wiskur, a designer and photographer. Also, I was an editor and photographer in the real world for 17 years ... all the while, thankful for an artful life and cherished memories. Photos are ©2019 Darrell D. Wiskur