Transformative Art of Edvard Munch The Scream

Digital transformative art in pixels of a masterpiece, Edvard Munch's The Scream
Edvard Munch’s masterpiece The Scream painted 100 years ago inspired my attempt at transformative art with pixels and vectors

Why I Painted a Copycat version of The Scream

Normally, I would term my digital recreation of Edvard Munch’s masterpiece The Scream a copycat, but today to recreate the art or photographs of others in a surprising or an unexpected way is termed “transformative art.” Transformative art has a fair use copyright standing in many cases.

My transformative art of Edvard Munch’s The Scream came about after watching an Adobe Live downstream featuring a Photoshop Contest with free digital brushes, designed by Kyle T. Webster.  Kyle designed the brushes after seven Munch brushes curated at the Munch Museum/Oslo.

I downloaded the Munch digital brushes from Adobe for Photoshop, and had dreams of creating a piece of digital art in the Munch style for the Adobe contest. I made my sketch, and started to paint with my Wacom pen.

However, my computer is a dinosaur, with a slow processor. Every stroke I took with the Munch brushes was like watching a swath of color slowly populating across my screen. As grand as it was to play with the Adobe Munch brushes, it was far too tedious for me, so I abandoned my sketch.

The Scream by Munch has proved itself a timeless classic due to its original expression of a universal theme, panic. Munch painted from life. He was walking with two friends on a bridge, and suddenly he heard nature screaming at him and deafening his thoughts. It was a singular experience that found its way onto his canvas.

Munch painted four different versions of The Scream. One hangs in  Oslo at the Munch Museum.

Continue reading Transformative Art of Edvard Munch The Scream

Free Munch Digital Brushes and Scream 5 Contest

Munch The Scream 5th Contest Sponsored by Adobe

Scream by Edvard Munch in pixels
Scream by Munch in Pixels

Edvard Munch’s The Scream is one of the most recognizable paintings ever. One of his four renditions of The Scream hangs in the Oslo Munch Museum, which houses the largest collection of Munch works in existence. The museum has also curated seven of his priceless brushes.

In collaboration with the museum, Adobe commissioned artist and art teacher Kyle T. Webster to replicate digital versions of Edvard’s brushes for Adobe Photoshop CC and Sketch. These digital brushes and tutorials are available to you free from Adobe.

Adobe sponsored a contest for a Scream 5 in July 2017, and offered these brushes for artists to create their own digital masterpiece, one inspired by the iconic Munch masterpiece. A print of the winning art would be exhibited at the museum next to Edvard’s The Scream.

Update: Contest ended August 1, 2017. See entries for Munch 5th on Adobe’s Behance.

Continue reading Free Munch Digital Brushes and Scream 5 Contest

Pixel Art Animation Tutorials from AdobeLive

Pixel Art of fish swimming in sea with an air balloon overhead that turns out to be a fisherman
Fishy, fishy in the Sea

Pixel Animation, Lesson One

Pixel Animation and Motion Design are mesmerizing and fun to watch on web pages if you like text and art dancing around your website like I do.

So, I made my first pixel art animation, Fishy, Fishy in the Sea. Plot: Fish are happily swimming  on an idyllic day when a seemingly peaceful air balloon floating overhead is piloted by a fisherman who pulls out a fishing reel and plunks a lure into the water. Water splashes. Fish scatter. End of story. The animation loops endlessly.

Learning from Pro Motion Designers

Earlier in March, AdobeLive from Paris streamed video of motion designers working with animation. Designers included: Made By Radio; Alexandra Lund; Lucile Patron; and Cyril Izran.

Over a 3-day time span, designers worked in their favorite Adobe animation programs and with their favorite tools and plugins.

On Day 1, watching Lucile Patron’s live stream, I caught the bug to design a pixel art animation.

Lucile Patron, AKA Fulifuli, made pixel art animation in Photoshop look so easy and fun, I thought, Why not me?

Continue reading Pixel Art Animation Tutorials from AdobeLive

New Year 2016 Wish

Grandpa’s wish for the merriest, happiest year

Darrell signed a Christmas card for our granddaughter Zlata with a wish for a “Merriest Happiest Year” to celebrate her first Christmas and the beginning of a New Year. She is about to crawl, so things will get merry, fast.

We haven’t hand-inscribed Christmas cards for friends and family for years. However, this year we bought some Charlie Brown stamps, sat down with our list, and started writing.

I was charmed when Darrell signed our granddaughter’s note wishing her a “merriest, happiest year,” and thought it a perfect sentiment for all as we begin a New Year.

Darrell gets a little wild when he signs cards. To share the full effect of his signature with you, I scanned it.  Then traced his ink letters in Illustrator, and added a frame with some embossing in Photoshop.

Chipping sparrow decked out for the New Year
“Chip” sparrow on a snowy day in festive attire

A new year of bird watching

Continue reading New Year 2016 Wish

Happy New Year!

Happy New YearKiss 2013 goodbye!  Friends were posting mini flipagram videos on Instagram to commemorate the new year, so I decided to dive into my photo files and make one as well.
I was an hour into the process and was about to jump ship and not finish, but I forged on and completed the video out of pure stubbornness. I limited myself to 84 photos for the video, which was like watching 2013 flash before my eyes.
After spending two hours on a self-absorbed video, I nearly felt guilty for wasting time, but in the process I saw all of the wonderful moments I’ve shared with friends and family
during the year and I was renewed seeing how much I have to be thankful for, so that I got excited about my first little flipagram and uploaded it to YouTubeFollow me on Instagram at patriciawiskur, as no snazzy nickname came to mind when I registered.
How To TutorialMy How To (top image):
There are three images layered for the end image. I scanned a vintage, beaded purse and layered it with a tie-dye decorated cake top in Photoshop. I set the top tie-dye layer to “color.”
I placed the carnival doll photo (after I deleted the background) on the top layer and gave it a gold outline with a gold color sampled from the background gold beads.
I made two additional copies of that doll and overlapped the three images in graduating sizes. For the text, I made a wavy line with the pen tool that curved in the opposite direction as the top hats and typed the text on the curving path in the Sybil Green font.

Happy New Year Tutorial ImagesI love the googly eyes on this vintage celluloid doll, dressed in a top hat and cane, ready  to welcome in the New Year with glitz.

Here’s to 2014!

Christmas Stockings Hung With Care

 Dear Santa ... Christmas stockings‘Tis the season to be merry!

Christmas stockings are a tradition in our family, and Santa, with the assistance of Mrs. Santa, fills the stockings on the Eve of Christmas while our children are fast asleep. It’s a lovely tradition.

Of course, we like our stockings brimming with good cheer. In my childhood, we were delighted with a stocking filled with an apple, an orange, a popcorn ball, and a candy cane.

As the acting Mrs. Santa one year when I was on a health kick, I baked cookies with a sugar substitute and attempted to bring back the apple, orange, popcorn ball, and candy cane idea from childhood.

While the children were all snug in their beds, with visions of sugar plums dancing in their heads, I, unfortunately, filled their stockings with fruit and trinkets.

Imagine the children’s dismay Christmas morning waking up to fruit.  No chocolate Santa wrapped in foil, no sweet and sour gummy worms, no M&Ms, no Reese’s PBCups — none of the children’s favorite candies.

And this naive act of mine took place at a time when stores were closed on Christmas morning. Nothing was open. There was no way to reprieve myself.  Mr. Santa couldn’t sneak out the back door and run to the candy store.

Santa had cautioned me about no candy, but I thought an old fashioned Christmas stocking would be as endearing to my children as it was to me as a child. Looking in the rear view mirror, I was clueless.

This is a cautionary tale: Never underestimate the power of  a well-filled stocking!
decorative flourishMy How-To Method for this graphic includes one paper and one frame from my Zany Design Kit on Etsy. There are 21 elements in my Zany Design Kit and two of those are gold, cut-out frames. The frames are easily modified in Elements or  Photoshop so that they can be any color you need to suit your graphic.

In Photoshop, I added a blue Adjustment Layer to a frame. Next, I threw on a Santa vector image I completed a few years back and three photos of Christmas stockings my daughter had painted for an open house.
The final touch was the text, Dear Santa … stuff it!

Hippie Cake Art!

Do Not Eat the Cake Before the Frosting
Cake and squiggles art

Eat Cake! And Frosting!

To each his own cake fetish. Some scrape frosting off the cake and eat it sans frosting. Others heap on frosting and ask for the slice of cake with the most frosting or the slice with the most roses.
It’s always fun judging a cake’s success after a party, which I do whenever I’ve made the cake. I look at the leftover dessert plates to see what the ratio of leftover cake to frosting is. If the plate is scraped clean, I know the cake was perfect.

But if there are globs of frosting on the plate, it’s back to the cookbook for the next cake.


Cake inspired my art montage

I took a photo of a tie-dyed, ice cream cake that I had sprayed with my favorite wild colors. Next, I masked out the background of the cake stand, leaving just the cake top.

I brought the simplified cake image into Illustrator and did a live-trace. Then, I brought the image into Photoshop and added squiggly lines made from paths in Illustrator.

Truthfully, the graphic is all over the place and the colors are bizarre; however, the making of the cake art was fun and a great exercise of thought when staring at a digital art board void of pixels.

As a final touch, I added a thought balloon because I question the philosophy of eating the frosting before the cake. I believe they should be eaten in unison.
The basic elements I used for this design were: a photo of a cake, tie-dyed with my favorite tie-dye colors, squiggles, a cartoon thought balloon, and a comic book font.
Illustrator and Photoshop Files

Here’s a fun video from my granddaughter’s Starbucks birthday party at the lake. She wrapped her cake in fondant under the tutelage of her Aunt Wendy and decorated it, Starbucks style.
When Gwen served the cake to guests, one wanted a piece of cake without the frosting and one wanted only frosting, so they shared a piece of cake: one ate the frosting and one ate the cake. Perfect social solution for teenagers.

Zany Cousins, Once Upon a Time, a Tutorial

Zany Frame and Grandkidz Fun
Grandkidz in a gilded frame, Zany Design Kit

Cousins at Play

Flashback: My grandchildren, Cousins Drew, Stephanie and Emma, zooming around the yard. This photo makes me smile every time I see it. The occasion was a reception for my granddaughter Julie’s high school graduation. It was May in the Ozarks. Spring fever had struck, and everyone was happy to celebrate a milestone event.
Play time: In Photoshop, I grabbed a photo, two backgrounds, a frame, and Peter Rabbit. The composition soon turned cartoonish, which I thought suited the photo. I chose a Comic font and a word balloon for Kapow. I’ve always wanted to say Kapow, and I’ve always adored the word balloons found in comic strips.
Method: I clipped a photo to a frame with a layer mask. Next, I layered two papers and added a Blending Mode for a rich, dimensional background. Finally, I added the Word Balloon Kapow and Peter Rabbit.

ZanyBroochFramePW200px
Gilded Zany Frame
ZanyBroochFrameMaskPW200
Zany mask

It’s all rather Zany. The frame is a vintage gold brooch. The frame and the frame-mask are part of my Zany Design Collection on Etsy. I clipped the black oval frame mask to the photo to confine the photo within the frame.
I layered two teal blue backgrounds and added a Difference Blending Mode to create a dimensional, red background. It’s fun exploring Blending Modes in Photoshop. It was a happy accident when I clicked Difference and two blues made a red. I had an entirely different look in mind when I began my Photoshop work, but when the red popped up, I fell in love and went to finish.

Teal Zig Zag Pattern
Background layer one

 

Teal Clouds Pattern
Background layer two

It was spring in the Ozarks, and the grass was green. A perfect home for Peter Rabbit.

Peter Rabbit Tin Toy by Mattel
Peter Rabbit tin toy by Mattel

Spa Day in Mexico Goes Zany

Zany Day at Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Scrapbook page for Spa Day, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Had fun in Photoshop, playing with the elements and paper from my Etsy Shop in my Zany Collection and made a 12″ by 12″ digital page around a favorite vacation spot, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.
It was my first spa day, and it was perfect. I’m a solar-operated girl, so a seaside cabana on the Sea of Cortez was ideal for a massage. I’m surprised I didn’t fall asleep listing to the lull of the waves.
Unfortunately, I miss being on the beach, so looking at my photos conjures up a heap of “Wish I Were There!”
Gold Zany Brooch Frame

Pumpkin Face Jack-O-Lantern This Halloween

Happy Halloween greeting with a pumpkin jack-o-lantern
Happy Halloween from Pumpkin Face

Put on a Pumpkin face – Happy Halloween

Autumn is here, bringing with it Halloween and Thanksgiving Day.

I know it’s officially autumn when Starbucks brings back one of my favorites, Pumpkin Spice Latte. Bring ’em on!  I am an equal opportunity pumpkin eater: Pumpkin Almonds (thank you, Planter’s), Pumpkin Bagels and Autumn Soup (thank you Panera), and Pumpkin Pie Blizzards (thank you, DQ!).

I love pumpkins so much that I grow my own pumpkins. My daughter gave me a blown glass pumpkin because of my love for pumpkins.

I decorated this pumpkin in Photoshop to wish you a Happy Halloween. I took a photo of a pumpkin my hubby carved and added layer mask and layer effects in Photoshop. I clipped those to the carved pumpkin image and Voila.

Pen tool, in action

My first step for my art was to isolate the pumpkin from its background with the pen tool so that the pumpkin had a transparent background. I used the  pen tool again to create a path for my text. I placed a photograph of my pansies on the bottom layer to complete my image.

It’s fun to start with a photograph of a pumpkin and end up with a jack-o-lantern.

Photoshop after all is a lot like playing in a sandbox.

Happy Halloween to all …

Peter Cottontail Toy Cutout

 

PAWPeterRabbitFlowers

Image for Your Projects

Peter Rabbit wind-up toy by Mattel
Cut-out image of Peter Cottontail toy by Mattel

Photograph of a vintage toy by Mattel

Here comes Peter Cottontail … Hopping down the bunny trail … Hippity, Hoppity, Easter’s on its way ...

For my art, I placed a digital image of the toy in the middle of my pansies.

I thought you might like a copy of this image for your scrapping and journal projects. Right click on the image to save a copy (.png) of Peter Cottontail.

This wind-up toy from 1953, played “Here Comes Peter Cottontail,” and was produced by Mattel.

Happy Easter!
PAWeaster-egg1

Lip-Smack Brush Tutorial

No matter how hard I strive for sophistication in design, my projects take a right turn towards the wild side as did my first journal kit, aptly named Zany.

I had fun creating Zany papers, buttons, brushes, and elements.
My favorite brush is the Lip-Smack Brush, and my favorite element is the pool ball button.
Here’s a preview of my kit, which includes 16 Papers, 20 Elements, and 2 Brushes.

Creating brushes in Adobe Photoshop is a cinch!

  • Slick your lips with a bright lipstick and kiss a piece of paper.
  • Scan the Lip-smack into your computer as a jpeg.
  • Create a black and white copy of the lip-smack. (Optional: I cleaned up the image and removed the white background from the scan so that I had a transparent background for a .png file.)
  • Select the Elliptical or Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag to create a selection around the Lip-smack.
  • With the Lip-smack selected, go to Edit>Define Brush Preset>Name your brush>Click OK.
  • Look for a visual image of the Lip-smack brush at the bottom of your brushes palette. Deselect your Lip-smack image.
  • Now the brush is in your brushes palette whenever you want to seal something with a kiss!

Before you close your image, save the lip-smack as a .png file so you have a brush and a handy image of the lip-smack, ready to put a personal stamp on your projects.