Binge Watching Wicked Tuna and Art on My Laptop

I’ve asked myself, Why do I binge-watch Wicked Tuna?

What is it about Wicked Tuna that I find myself binge watching fishermen catching bluefin tuna in the Atlantic until their eyes dilate from lack of sleep? Is it the suspense waiting for a tuna to bite or holding my breath while the fishermen land the fish. It’s an epic tale until that tuna is landed and turned into a paycheck for Sushi and the Japanese marketplace.

Will that tuna make good Sushi? Does it have a clear core and does it have good fat in the majors and minors. I’m spellbound for an hour to see which boat catches the biggest and best fish each week. How much cash their fish brings determines which boat is ahead on the dollar scoreboard and wins the fishing season.

Wicked Tuna equals ocean waves, boats, and fish

Like a good movie, book, or adventure, the setting is key, and Wicked Tuna is set on the Atlantic, in fishing boats. No wonder I am mesmerized watching ocean waves and beautiful sunsets and sunny skies, all aboard a boat. What’s not to love?

Binge watching Wicked Tuna is Great for Working on my Laptop

Laptop art Edvard Munch's The Scream in pixels as transformative art in a frame
The Scream, my transformative take of the Munch masterpiece

Often, I am busy on my laptop designing digital art whenever I watch  Wicked Tuna on the National Geographic channel. If I end up with a completed sketch by the end of the program, I justify the bucket of time I dumped into watching TV.

Lately, I painted my version of The Scream, the iconic masterpiece by Edvard Munch. And I  designed a frame as I watched Wicked Tuna, which I painted with a Jelly Bean array of colors and not the classic Munch palette.

Surely the sunny waves and water inspired my bright colors as I painted.

 

Zany Cousins, Once Upon a Time, a Tutorial

Zany Frame and grandchildren riding in a jeep having zany fun
Grandkids in a gilded frame from my Zany Design Kit

Cousins at Play

Flashback: Grandchildren, Cousins Drew, Stephanie and Emma, zooming around the yard. This photo makes me smile every time I see it. The occasion was a reception for my granddaughter Julie’s high school graduation. It was May in the Ozarks. Spring fever had struck, and everyone was happy to celebrate a milestone event.

On the computer …

Play time: In Photoshop, I grabbed the photo, two backgrounds, a frame, and Peter Rabbit. The composition soon turned cartoonish, which I thought suited the photo. I chose a Comic font and a word balloon for Kapow. I’ve always wanted to say Kapow, and I’ve always adored the word balloons found in comic strips.
Method: I clipped a photo to a frame with a layer mask. Next, I layered two papers and added a Blending Mode for a rich, dimensional background. Finally, I added the Word Balloon Kapow and Peter Rabbit.

ZanyBroochFramePW200px
Gilded Zany Frame
ZanyBroochFrameMaskPW200
Zany mask

It’s all rather Zany

The frame is a vintage gold brooch. The frame and the frame-mask are part of my Zany Design Collection on Etsy. I clipped the black oval frame mask to the photo to confine the photo within the frame.
I layered two teal blue backgrounds and added a Difference Blending Mode to create a dimensional, red background.

It’s fun exploring Blending Modes in Photoshop. It was a happy accident when I clicked Difference and two blues made a red. I had an entirely different look in mind when I began my Photoshop work, but when the red popped up, I fell in love and went to finish.

Teal Zig Zag Pattern
Background layer one

 

Teal Clouds Pattern
Background layer two

It was spring in the Ozarks, and the grass was green. A perfect home for Peter Rabbit.

Peter Rabbit Tin Toy by Mattel
Peter Rabbit tin toy by Mattel